Saturday, 29 March 2014

Sepia Saturday - Water, Water Everywhere.

Sepia Saturday give bloggers an opportunity to share their family history  and personal memories through photographs 
Until recently, I lived in Hawick, the largest town in the Scottish Borders.  In the 1970's the River Teviot flooded and my husband, a teacher, took these photographs around the High School which to the delight of many children was closed for a few days. 

Thirty years later the river flooded again with much more serious damage and distress in the town - unoftunateley I cannot find the photographs of that occasion!   











This was the scene in in Wilton Lodge Park




The same bridge and river on a much more peaceful day

Click HERE to see other bloggers' watery tales



Copyright © 2014 · Susan and Neil  Donaldson.  All Rights Reserved


12 comments:

  1. This reminds me of a place we once lived in Missouri. The Fishing River flooded like this but it was after we left.

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  2. What a lovely serene picture of the bridge and river in last photo, would like to visit there.

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  3. I remember you sent me a picture or pictures of the more recent flooding of the Teviot but I can't remember exactly where I put them. I still have them somewhere, though - I think? I like the pix your husband took better anyway with the children all looking so joyous about the probability of the school closing. :))

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  4. Whenever I see such photos I think of the idiots who still drive across flooded sections of road, bridges etc. Might be safe, but what terrible consequences if something's happened to the road below the surface. I've a healthy respect for water.

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  5. The kids probably loved wading in the water.

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  6. Sometimes I do think that it is a good job that people have always taken photographs of floods, otherwise we might be tempted to think that they are new phenomenon. I suppose as we build more and more on the traditional flood plains they have the capacity to be more destructive. But also we have more news programmes - and hence more news to make.

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  7. I doubt if there would be many townsfolk these days who have some gumboots ready for wet weather emergencies. I know I don't.

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  8. I don't think I'd be standing on that bridge with the water roaring through underneath! We're very trusting of engineers aren't we, and we still underestimate the power of nature.

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  9. Read Boobook's comment and forgot what I was going to say - my nephew is finishing his engineering degree and working with a bridge design company - his father (my brother) says he will not drive over any more bridges :)

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  10. Yeah, there is the really horrific flood and there is the mildly annoying one that becomes a fun little diversion if you have the proper boots and maybe even a little canoe. We used to get that kind occasionally and neighborhood kids would canoe down the street laughing at the novelty of being able to paddle a canoe down the street.

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  11. Some great flood photos there. Well done you!

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  12. The turmoil in that third shot is fascinating.

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