Thursday, 13 March 2014

Sepia Saturday: Underneath the Arches


Each week Sepia Saturday, provides an opportunity for genealogy bloggers to share their family history through photographs. 




My first photographs matches this week's prompt of the Library of Congress so well.  It too was taken in Washington DC,  on a visit in 2000 - in the Rotunda of the Capitol. 


President Washington laid the cornerstone of the U.S. Capitol on September 18, 1793.


Below - the Massachusetts State House  in Boston, built in 1798 on land owned the John Hancock, the first elected governor of Massachusetts.  The dome, originally made out of wood shingles, is now sheathed in copper and covered by 23 carat gold.


Much closer to my home - arches in the Scottish Borders

 


Leaderfoot Viaduct spans the 90 mile long River Tweed  near its junction with one of its many tributaries - the Leader Water.  The viaduct stands 116 feet  above the river bed and each of its 19 arches has a 43 foot span.  The railway bridge opened in 1865 with the last  train running over it  a hundred years later.  


Thomas Girtin 006.JPG
Jedburgh Abbey from the river 1798-99" by Thomas Girtin
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jedburgh_Abbey

Jeburgh Abbey was one of four Border Abbeys established in the 12th century by King  David 1 of Scotland. Lying only 10 miles north of the Border, the abbey was repeatedly sacked by English forces, most notably in 1544 when the Earl of Hertford's army raided the region in what was known as the "Rough Wooing" - an attempt by Henry VIII to enforce the marriage of the young Mary Queen of Scots to his son, the future Edward VI.   After  the Protestant Reformation   in 1560, the monks were allowed to stay,  but the abbey was used for a long time  as the parish kirk for the reformed religion until a new parish church was built in 1871.


Today - the  arches of the ruined Abbey




Hundy Mundy - an 18th century Gothic folly at Mellerstain, near Kelso, built by William Adam, the famous architect who also designed Mellerstain House.


A peaceful view across to the Cheviot Hills in the distance  on the Border.


I could not help but think of the 1932 song, made famous by Flanagan and Alla

"Underneath the arches
I dream my dreams away"



Click HERE to see other Sepia Saturday stories of domes, friezes, ceilings and arches.

Copyright © 2014 · Susan Donaldson and Jill Donaldson.  All Rights Reserved
See Also:  Jill on   Pinterest 

20 comments:

  1. What fun, and a great span of different arches! Viaduct somehow got stuck in my mind as having to carry water, but now I'm firmly resolved to understand it's the series of arches no matter what they carry, and railroads are just fine as viaducts too. Thanks! (Incidentally, I wonder if a single state capital in the US doesn't have a dome!)

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  2. The photo of Hundy Mundy is especially dramatic. Despite my reticence about heights, seeing viaducts and aqueducts like these always fills me with a desire to walk along the top ... strange.

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  3. Isn't the Leaderfoot Viaduct the 'Harry Potter' railroad, or is that another? I wonder how different history might have been, had Queen Mary married Henry the VIII's son, Edward VI. History is full of 'what if's'. What if the Russian Army had accepted Napoleon into its ranks? What if Hitler had been accepted to the art school he wanted to attendl? Kind of boggles the mind. Anyway, I enjoyed your informative post very much. :))

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  4. The Leaderfoot Viaduct is very attractive, but I am afraid of heights and get scared just looking at it.

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  5. The viaduct looks rather delicate, but I'm sure in person it's much heftier.

    I've seen that gold dome in Boston. To me, it's a big waste of gold. Atlanta has a dome like that, as does the capitol building in Charleston, West Virginia. West Virginia of all places! I guess the gold dome must stand for something - a sign of power and wealth?? Eh ~ beats me.

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  6. Beautiful post thanks for sharing.

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  7. How I wish we’d visited the Capitol on our Washington visit. I have been to Jedburgh however, and if I’ honest that, and the wonderful viaduct in your picture, appeal far more to me.

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  8. The arches of the ruined abbey fill me with desolation - such ruin...so sad. I love your first photo though - what a coup!

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  9. Amazing arches! Thanks for sharing your photos.

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  10. I love those arches, they are perfect!

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  11. I also love the viaduct arches - such a feat of engineering

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  12. The Capitol certainly is one very impressive dome! We visited Jedburgh too, a couple years ago, on the way back from Ballater to London.

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  13. I love your arches at the Scottish border. They are beautiful!

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  14. A great series of images. I especially like viaducts, extraordinary feats of engineering, which always draw my mind to wonder about the lives of the individuals who built them.

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  15. Those are some lovely arches, and what a bridge, very stunning.

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  16. Now I have to go look up more information about the "Gothic Folly" It looks so lonely and desolate.

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  17. A good variety of arches and architecture. It was only last summer that I was introduced to the many abbey ruins in Britain. The engineering is very impressive for the era. There were some skilled craftsmen at work in those centuries.

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  18. Love the splendor of viaducts!

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  19. Beautiful pictures of arches :) I notice you are planning on participating in the A to Z challenge too. I am preparing for my first challenge at the moment which is distracting me from other blog posts. regards Anne

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  20. The viaduct is stunning. I wish I'd seen it in person.

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