Thursday, 7 February 2013

Sepia Saturday: Snowy Tales


Each week, Sepia Saturday, provides an opportunity for genealogy bloggers to share their family history through photographs.
 
This week we have a snowy theme - very appropriate as it was snowing when I began writing this post.
 
 



I live in Earlston in the Scottish Borders and here is an old photograph of the Red Lion pub in the Square.  The driver of this unusual sledge seems to be dressed very formally in a top hat and is not particularly well  wrapped up against the elements.  And who was he waiting for?  There does not seem to be any path cleared through the snow from  the pub.  Or was it a promotional photograph? 
From the collection of the Heritage Hub, Hawick.
 
An idyllic snowy picture of Selkirk c.1925.  from the collection of the Heritage Hub, Hawick


I have no winter photographs of my childhood - cameras must have been reserved for summer and I  can't say I have any memorable weather memories from my childhood - I was too young to recollect the dreadful winter of 1947.    I grew up in north-west England where winters were relatively mild, but this was the days before tights and girls then did not wear trousers. A Liberty bodice, skirt with short socks (short trousers for my brother), homeknitted jumpers and pixie hood, wellington boots, gloves kept safe on string through my sleeves, plus a long scarf criss crossed over my chest and tied at the back - this was the ritual dress for going out in winter in my early 1950's childhood. I hated Liberty bodices - the rubber buttons were difficult to do and undo, and if the day got warmer you ended up all sticky inside them. 
 
My daughter was born in January so an unfortunate time for planning parties.   Here she is on her 4th birthday - not looking too happy outside our home  in Hawick in the Scottish Borders.   She follows my childhood trend of having gloves on a string1  
 
 
  
 I spent a wonderful  year 1965-66  working in Cambridge, Massachussets near Boston and this photograph brings back memories of the kind of winter I had not experienced before -  here in a picturesque image of  Harvard Chapel.
 
 
 
The pleasures of having a dog in winter 2010  in the Sottish Borders.
 
 
Winter 2010 - the frozen Rriver Teviot at Hawick, Scottish Borders
 

 

A heron - a familiar site on the River Slitrig in Hawick

 
And finally a fun snow picture of  me perched on top on  of my husband's  car.  It was taken in 1971 in the first flush of engagement as he would not normally countenance anyone sitting on his car. But at least he spread a blanket for me to sit on.   Note the 1970's fashion statement - peter pan collar, mini skirt, and striped coat!  
 
 
  
Click HERE to see how other bloggers have ploughed their way through snow this week

27 comments:

  1. I've never heard of a Liberty vest, but your description of how you dressed for the weather reminds me of how I dressed too, minus the vest.

    I like the picture of you walking the dog because I get a real sense of just how much snow fell. We haven't had a really deep snow here in ages. Not that I'm complaining!

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  2. You mention that the first picture is taken in front of the Red Lion pub. If I look at the picture carefully I read it is a hotel and it is "job and postmaster licensed". Indeed there is lion over the sign.
    The gloves on a string look very familiar.
    I always wonder how herons survive in those circumstances with frozen rivers and all that. And I think it was very nice that your husband bought a car with a license plate already indicating that ScotSue would be his wife to be :)

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    1. Thank you, Peter, for a clsoer look at the photograph. I am afraid my eyesight is not good, but I had made out the Lion symbol which I thought confirmed the name, as at present, with the building operating as a pub.

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  3. The snow really is beautiful. However, that is coming from someone who doesn't have to brave going out in such weather! If I had to live in it, my perspective may change - I don't know! Great memories for you.

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  4. I also have few old photos of the snow.. I guess everyone was too cold to get the camera out!

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  5. That is a great postcard, but how did it get there? You can see the iron runners, they disappear under the contraption, but they leave no marks.. Could be that it has sat there while the snow covered up the tracks but then Driver, the horses and sleigh show no signs of snow and there are no footprints.

    Was it touched up?

    Herons and knees; what more could one wish for?

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  6. "Job and Postmaster" - I wonder what that means? It seems an unusually high sleigh, presumably to keep the occupants above the enormous snowdrifts, should the sleigh become embedded, and while waiting for rescue they would be high and dry?

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  7. It is interesting to note that we came to the same conclusions about the lack of snowy pictures from our youth. You have a great collection of later photographs, and some very interesting earlier ones (I do always like a picture with a pub in it!)

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  8. Love the photo variety of different snow-times, especially the engagement photos and 70s trends.

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  9. Lack of snowy pictures in our case is easy to explain - on-one had a camera. I thought the chap ouside the pub looked rather like an undertaker. Great dog = they don't seem to mind the snow.

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  10. A lovely collection of snow pictures.

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  11. Thank you to everyone for their comments. It is interesting that so many of us (of a certain age?) don't have winter photos of our childhood. Just shows how memories are important!

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  12. I remember Peter Pan collars, but I have no idea what a Liberty bodice is.

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  13. The Selkirk photo is lovely -- and I must say, the eagle eye of my fellow SSers is making me a much more discerning observer. This day and age seems foster a quick look and off to another thing, where as here I am beginning to enjoy just losing myself for a few minutes in the picture. That's a good thing to do -- and your pictures certainly gave me much to enjoy.

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  14. Ah Liberty Bodices, what memories. Oh and we had gloves on elastic too, so I don't think it was just Scotland. The Borders are beautiful and we have holidayed there in the past, although in sunnier weather. I think you're right about the certain age thing of having no snowy pics of ourselves.

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  15. I remember gloves on a string, but mine were mittens. Even though we didn't get snow, it did get cold at times. Lovely pictures and memories. Thank you for sharing.

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  16. I had to google the Liberty Bodice. Did you attach stockings to it. We had garter belts for that purpose (to hold up our saggy woolen or lisle stockings) and wore thick undershirts in the winter. I love the photo of you perched on your husband's car!!

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  17. Really fun photos. Those mittens on a string were so nostalgic.
    Nancy

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  18. Your daughter's rosy cheeks are evident even in black and white. I had mittens on a string, too, growing up in Iowa, but my favorite was a furry muff for times other than play or school.

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  19. What a great grouping of pictures ... the season is winter but you have shown us the seasons of your life. Your daughter is so cute.

    We had our "big snow" in Oregon in 1970. We were allowed to wear pants under our dresses to school, and then after that it wasn't long before cut-off shorts and halter tops were allowed!

    Kathy M.

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  20. We had mittens on a string, too -- I can remember how awful it felt when somebody pulled on the string! My father called them "stupid mittens," as in "don't lose your mittens, stupid." He said it in fun, though...ah! those memories!

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  21. I have lots of photographs of me and my sister from the first 4 years of my life. After that there were none until I was ready to leave home.

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  22. My mother never let me have mittens on a string! Even though all my friends did! Your first photo is very elegant and I'd love a ride- and your last photo is very cool too- so good that it should have been a magazine ad!

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  23. I love that last picture, with you in 1970's fashion. I wore a miniskirt too, and lookalike shoes. Enjoyed your post!

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  24. I wore many a mini skirt, but not in snow, I don't think. How on earth did we keep our legs warm outside? Love your collection of pictures, thanks so much for introducing yourself. I'll have to google Scottish Borders since I'm across the pond.

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  25. Snow should have colors. A distinctive color for every region. Blue for Canada, Magenta for the Alps, Green for Greenland of course, and Plaid for Scotland!

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  26. A great start with that pic of the sleigh and the pub and interesting recollection on your part. Loved the finale, you sitting on the hood, but was that blanket to keep you from the cold metal, or to keep you from scratching it?!?...
    ;)~
    HUGZ

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